Oh No, Kaiju!

wishyouwerehearblog:

Pachimon Postcards, 1970s

‘Bromide cards showing various pachimon kaiju (imitation creatures based loosely on famous TV and movie monsters) at iconic locations around the world. Published by Yokopro in the 1970s.’

(via jimpluff)

Posted: Nov. 17,2012 | 804 |
monsterman:

Godzilla vs. Megalon (1973)

monsterman:

Godzilla vs. Megalon (1973)

(via kaijusaurus)

Posted: Nov. 15,2012 | 178 |

xombiedirge:

IDW Godzilla Covers by Jeff Zornow


 I was going to make a dedication to Jeff Zornow for his excellent cover work, but this is already circulating so I opted out of that plan. All of his work has a great sense of scale and drama and definitely one of the best new wave of artists to be associated with Godzilla since IDW began doing Godzilla comics. It’s no wonder he was literally petitioned to start doing interiors, but unfortunately that just isn’t how the industry works.

Posted: Nov. 14,2012 | 577 |

KAIJUCAST discusses SON OF GODZILLA

If you aren’t tuning into the premiere podcast for all things Kaiju, then you’re missing out. Give Kyle Yount and friends a listen this episode where they talk about an Oh No! Kaiju favorite, Son of Godzilla ( Monster Island’s Decisive Battle: Godzilla’s Son (怪獣島の決戦 ゴジラの息子 Kaijū-shima no Kessen Gojira no Musuko)

kakuranger:

[ATTACK] Samurai Rage Bomber & Samurai Rage Kill.

When Ninjaman turned into Samuraiman (サムライマン), he had two finishing moves.

The first technique was the Samurai Rage Bomber (サムライ激怒ボンバー; Samurai gekido bonbaa). After Samuraiman gathered energy into his palms, he threw it forward in the shape of a red sphere. This first appeared in episode 36.

The second, and less used, maneuver was the Samurai Rage Kill (サムライ激怒斬り; Samurai gekido kiri). Samuraiman simply slashed the target with the Samurai Javelin. This was first seen in episode 45.

Source: kakuranger.tumblr.com

Posted: Nov. 12,2012 | 37 |
kaijucast:

kaiju-confessions:

Growing up, I didn’t have superheroes. We couldn’t afford comic books. Instead, I got to watch my dad’s Godzilla tapes which he left behind. Godzilla was the only superhero I had as a kid, and when he adopted and raised Minya, he was a better father than I ever had.

Again, this is not my personal quote, but a good one nonetheless…

Beautiful. A testament to how the academic or intellectual grade of material has no relevance to how powerful a story can be to someone. 

kaijucast:

kaiju-confessions:

Growing up, I didn’t have superheroes. We couldn’t afford comic books. Instead, I got to watch my dad’s Godzilla tapes which he left behind. Godzilla was the only superhero I had as a kid, and when he adopted and raised Minya, he was a better father than I ever had.

Again, this is not my personal quote, but a good one nonetheless…

Beautiful. A testament to how the academic or intellectual grade of material has no relevance to how powerful a story can be to someone. 

(Source: )

Posted: Nov. 11,2012 | 104 |
monsterman:


Godzilla vs. Mechagodzilla (1974)
The Simians - aliens of the third planet from the black hole - the creators of Mechagodzilla.


What a great quality image of the rarely seen Black Hole Aliens in full armament! Love the belt buckle; would make General Ursus proud.Also, are those Mysterian rayguns? It’s incredible that they still had those kicking around.

monsterman:

Godzilla vs. Mechagodzilla (1974)

The Simians - aliens of the third planet from the black hole - the creators of Mechagodzilla.

What a great quality image of the rarely seen Black Hole Aliens in full armament! Love the belt buckle; would make General Ursus proud.

Also, are those Mysterian rayguns? It’s incredible that they still had those kicking around.

andtheliquidmen:

Fan-made diagram of the Oxygen Destroyer from Godzilla (1954)

andtheliquidmen:

Fan-made diagram of the Oxygen Destroyer from Godzilla (1954)

(Source: cosmicmonstersounds, via rdmpsy)

Posted: Nov. 9,2012 | 197 |

brettpunk:

Biollante is probably the coolest looking kaiju ever.

(via kaijucast)

Posted: Nov. 9,2012 | 65 |

TRUE ORIGIN OF GODZILLA

One of the bigger pet peeves of most Godzilla fans is the generalization and dismissal of Godzilla’s origin as being “a mutant lizard”, an issue that was only galvanized in the public conscious by the Emmerich & Devlin GODZILLA. It denies Godzilla of the minor nuances that are important to understanding the character and its roots, primarily done so by a popular culture that has never experienced the horrors of atomic weapons and has lost touch with their destruction consequences. 

But this lack of understanding of Godzilla’s original origins extends even through his fans. Specifically, the elaborated origin of the Heisei cycle (‘84-‘95) with the Godzillasaurus on Lagos Island being struck with fallout from a Hydrogen Bomb test has been retroactively applied to the entirety of the Godzilla canon incorrectly, with no consideration for the original intentions for the character.

So here in photo-set form the theorized background for Godzilla as concluded by Dr. Yamane from the original Godzilla (‘54). An origin of more scientific nuance, containing the environmental consequences of atomic testing and showing the truly distinct nature of Godzilla as something more fantastic then something cut from purely scientific cloth.

"Approximately two million years ago, the Brontosaurus and other Dinosaurs were at their peak. Scientists call this the Jurassic period. It’s believed that during the following geological period, the Cretaceous period, a rare intermediate organism was evolving from a marine reptile into a terrestrial animal. Following Odo Island tradition, I propose for the time being that we call this creature Godzilla. … It was probably hidden away in a deep sea cave, providing for its own survival and perhaps for others like it. However, repeated underwater H-bomb tests have completely destroyed its natural habitat. To put it simply, Hydrogen Bomb testing has driven it from its sanctuary.”
~Dr. Yamane, on Godzilla’s origin

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